Tag Archive: advertising


Facebook logo

Image via Wikipedia

6 Career-Killing Facebook Mistakes – Investopedia Slideshows.

Heard things about Facebook and how it can damage your career search?  Maybe you have…but have you heard specifically what to avoid?  Here are six things to avoid doing that you don’t want to do with your social media accounts.

Yesterday’s post featured a claim that Google-use had been overtaken by Facebooking time.  In other words, the users who search on Google are spending less time doing that than the users of Facebook are spending on that favorite social-media service.

Think about what Facebook hosts already, things primarily that used to be available only elsewhere on the internet:

  • Instant Messaging: With Facebook-chat, one can always catch up with friends online
  • E-mail: Facebook Messages allow one to communicate with one another just like you would with (old-fashioned?) e-mail.  User-to-user long-form messaging is what that’s all about.
  • Content: Growing numbers of Facebook pages/groups are starting to be the go-to options for businesses, even before they have their own professional webpages. Having so many users and contacts all right there to plug in to whatever cause, venture or endeavor you’re doing is just too tempting—especially when compared with the work necessary to get a regular website the type of traffic a Facebook page can potentially get with just a few clicks.
  • Advertising:  Sure, you can buy banner ads on the rest of the regular-old internet, but that old dinosaur (I say tongue-in-cheekly, but with an alarming edge of seriousness) is going the way of the…internet.  Why?  What gives Facebook ads a competitive edge?  Immediately available demographic data for pinpoint accuracy and market targetting.
  • Digg-style Media Sharing:  Yup, you can have…really any kind of media shared on Facebook, from video, to pictures, to text and more.
  • Games, games, games:  I’m surprised that this one didn’t blow the rest of them out of the water—or rather, I wouldn’t be surprised if this one wasn’t the number one reason that Facebook is the one-stop shop for everyone and the number one place for spending time.  Facebook games, which always bring in that social attachment, are highly addictive. FarmTown/FarmVille anyone?

I don’t think that there’s a whole lot more that needs to be said here.  I suppose the only thing that Facebook doesn’t have going for it is a good way to search the internet…oops, they have a Google built-in option for that.  I wonder if time spent using the Google plug-in to search the web (while still in the content-frame/shell of Facebook) counts as time for Google?  Probably not.

Basically, you can do anything on Facebook that you can do on the rest of the internet, but with Facebook’s dynamic social-linking engine, you can do it with your friends.

So why would you go anywhere else?

Spoked flywheel

Image via Wikipedia

Well, so far, and I’ve only been at this about a month and (30+ articles or so), I’ve had a quick glimpse on what it takes to make your blog take off.  Here’s an initial round of thoughts on the subject!  (I figured you all needed something better today after that last post.)

1. Keep contributing away… I picked up a booklet at the local grocery megamart today.  Meijer, apparently put out a little pamphelet called “College Survival Guide” or some such thing…I thought it was an ingenious form of marketing, and one that gives credence to the new internet marketing model of “contributing.” Rather than just having ads, this was actually a helpful little boost of information that would do good to the reader/consumer, and also incentive sales…

2. …and see your results take off. Fly away with the flywheel— a term used in business, no less relevant here.  First of all, my blog seems to be following that addage, as I’ve tried to push through my commitment to getting one post out a day, every day, using a buffer, as much as I can.  (By buffer, I’m referring to a period-based block of content, that includes multiple posts ready-written, that are already in-line to go live, before you submit the first one to see the light of day.)  In other words, keep pressing through.  The “flywheel,” as it where, is a device that saves energy, or rather, requires a great deal of exertion up front, but gathers momentum, until it becomes very easy to keep it going, as it has gained an inertial forward-motion of its own.

2.  You have to hit the right time of day. Yes, I mentioned that in the last one or two posts…but I thought I’d mention it again, with a little bit of further explanation.  (I noticed that the blog…it dipped off on the 8th as I posted late in the day—so my “airplane takeoff trajectory” feel on my dashboard stats did a sudden nosedive.)

3. Give people what they want, when they want it. A spike in traffic occurred when I put out my first post about the KindleKindle was hot when it was “trending“—but maybe has lost some of its initial glamor and is now kind of soft in the “looked-at-ness” online.  Point being…it may have been on everyone’s mind, but my second post  about Kindle may have either lacked the same immediacy and/or relevance, or the topic just happened to stop being on everyone’s mind.

See us again for a little look on how a Google post got scraped up!

Google offers a number of contextualized advertising services—where they seem to be making all of their revenue.  AdSense is the commonly known name—and this allows advertisers to literally buy clicks, with a portion of their payment going to Google, and a portion going to the owner of whatever website choose to host those ads.  Seems like a great win-win solution all around.

One thing to note about all of this: things always get a little bit more complicated when money becomes involved. Though you may be used to setting up free accounts from Google and other services on the spur of the moment, this is not an instantaneous process, and does take some review time on Google’s part, as well as some time on yours to set up. Leave yourself a few hours to get it all figured out.

Note: Free WordPress-blog accounts (on WordPress’ on server/site) do not support placing AdSense ads.  You would have to move the back-end PHP files and install them on your own server.  Luckily, there is a forwarding option if you want to keep your traffic (though SEO rank may not transfer) and also do domain mapping, I believe, so that you can keep forwarding from individual blogs.

Stay tuned for my test of Google AdSense ads on this blog.  Here’s my first attempt elsewhere:  LifeTrain, LLC‘s Resume Blog: When Should I Use An Objective On My Resume?.

%d bloggers like this: