Tag Archive: Searching


Google Search homepage

Image via Wikipedia

At the top of a list of articles that I’m pleased with, are the ones that made it to the first page of Google.

Top Articles are on the First Page of Google

One thing that I’ve learned recently is that when it comes to ranking on search engines, you really had best be on the front page.  Google users have changed their search patterns. For them, the top articles they’re likely to click-through and read are going to be on the front page of Google.

Top (Traffic) Articles are not on Deeper Pages of Google

No longer do they drill down to the second, third, fourth and fifth pages of results (which for everything there are usually millions of some kind of results).  Though this may happen occasionally, what is incredibly more likely to happen is for them to simply go back to the search box and refine their search.  (I know that’s what I do.)

My “Top” Articles on Google

Yes, this leaves me excited!  That’s how I felt to discover some of my posts were on the top page of Google.  These articles were ones I’d just put out there, with no real intention (usually) that they’d end up on the front page of Google. Many bloggers have number one positions, and a lot more traffic, but for me, this is a fun start.

At any rate, I’m happy to share that a number of articles from  NewTechnologyGeek.com have actually become “top articles on Google” (at least being on the front page of search).

 

Today’s Top Articles on Google (Mar.06/2011)

As of the time of the writing of this article, (and these always change) the following articles were ranked on the first page of Google for relevant search terms!  Here are some, separated by categories.

Keyword optimization (making sure I was conscious about finding a niche with openness to certain keywords — i.e. no strong competing sites with keyword-based traction; containing those words in that specific arrangement) was my only real tool of optimization.  That and outbound links, though I consider that a subset of the larger tactic, since being aware of the visible text of your links is fairly significant, I understand.

With each article/webpage, I note whether or not I spent time doing that kind of optimization, or just wrote it “off the cuff” and let it fly, I note at the end of each entry.

 

Sectional Pages on the Front Page of Google

  1. New Technology Geek.com:  The home-page of this website—which you should expect to rank on the first (top) page for its own name.  Now, granted, this is not technically an article, but I’m happy it’s on the first page of Google.  Search Terms:new technology geek, “new technology geek” [Yes, this is a “first result” top listing, though this shouldn’t really count as a “top article on Google.”]  (Not optimized at all.)
  2. Recent Trends Category Page which, though it’s not really an article, still comes out on the top/front page of Google for this search.  The reason being is that near the top of this page is the following article:  Splainers.com: Let Us Stick Figure Your Story which is a short review/explanation of what the Splainers site is, was a surprising hit over top of other links out there.  Search terms: splainers.com

Notable Sites and/or Recommendations on the Front Page of Google

  1. Splainers.com: (see above)   Search terms: splainers.com (Not optimized.)
  2. Qwerty to Dvorak Converter: If you got your keyboard stuck in a different keyset input mode, and you already typed a bunch of text, how can you save yourself the time of retyping it?  (Recommending an online converter/translator site.)  Search terms: qwerty to dvorak, qwerty to dvorak converter, dvorak to qwerty converter, etc.  (Maybe optimized?)
  3. Several Sources for Free apps for the Mac: The app store and a number of freeware and shareware lists and sources online.  I’m really geeked about making this a “top” (front page) article on Google since, despite a lack of research on my part, I suspect this is a fairly commonly searched term.  We’ll see.  Search terms: free apps for the mac (Optimized)

How-To Articles on the First Page of Google

  1. How to Freeze Panes in Excel 2008: This is a really simple article describing how to fix a particular Excel problem with “freezing panes”  (maintaining visibility on the first one or more rows and/or columns).  Search terms: freeze panes in excel, excel freeze panes, etc. (Optimized?  Probably not optimized—one good note is that I made sure to include in the title and meta-keyword [tags] the version and operating environment so that people would be more likely to find this if it was exactly what they were looking for.)
  2. How to Set Your YouTube Thumbnail: The basic quarters (25%, 50%, 75%) rule, as described elsewhere, with insight on the wiggle-variability of where thumbnail frames actually show up. Search terms: how to set your youtube thumbnail, youtube thumbnail video how, etc. (Optimized, I think.)

Stories and Articles (Informational) on the First Page of Google

  1. JC Penny’s Google Black Hat Tryst: At the recommendation of Girbe E. from the Film Farm, I checked out the story of how JC Penny appears to have used some “black hat” techniques to get all sorts of their products to be top articles on Google’s front page(s) of search results.  Though a number of professional news outlets covered this, apparently it wasn’t all that many, and this one got to be on the front page too.  Search terms: JC Penny and Google, (Optimized unintentionally.)  Perhaps losing traction.
  2. Who’s Afraid of Duplicate Content?: Wow. This short anecdote which mentions Google’s algorithm change and how a bad example might’ve hurt someone else’s rankings….Well, this one blew my socks off getting on the first page of Google (which it seems to be slowly edging off.)  Search terms: duplicate content [Maybe it was just freshness—but it’s neat to have landed on the front page of Google for a two-word search string. (Not exactly long tail!)], Google algorithm change and Duplicate Content, etc.

 

First Page Traffic Breakdown

What I’ve heard is that the distribution between traffic from Google search results gives the web-page that ranks at the top in natural search about 35% of the total web-traffic available on that search.  The rest goes to the remainder of the articles found on the first page of search, and subsequent Google pages do not rank at all.

 

My Next Goal

Now, if only I get the top search result for articles written here.  That’ll be my next goal—getting some articles in the top result on relevant front pages for a particular subject or search keywords.

Speaking of Google…

In all this, I’m wondering if the “scraper” traffic I saw earlier (that picked up my articles) was automatic (I’m assuming) or perhaps some third-world worker in a net-scraping factor (not likely).  Who or what ever it is, it seems to be going along just fine—and picking up mention of keywords—well, mostly “Google.”

So, I’m wondering if my theory is correct, and if a mere mention of the word “Google” will actually attract the attention of visitors.  So here goes: GOOGLE!

I’m assuming that the robots would pick this up, but human aggregators would ignore this.

Google in 1998, showing the original logo

Image via Wikipedia

Well, okay,that wasn’t very nice to actual committed readers of this blog (I know you’re out there—even if you don’t!) and so I’ll give you a little tidbit…

Have you ever Googled Google?  What did that Google search find?  The top Google hit, I found very relevant.

I’ll explain more later: Hint: That’s where developers and developments post and get posted by Google.  Great way to stay abreast of developments there.

Yesterday’s post featured a claim that Google-use had been overtaken by Facebooking time.  In other words, the users who search on Google are spending less time doing that than the users of Facebook are spending on that favorite social-media service.

Think about what Facebook hosts already, things primarily that used to be available only elsewhere on the internet:

  • Instant Messaging: With Facebook-chat, one can always catch up with friends online
  • E-mail: Facebook Messages allow one to communicate with one another just like you would with (old-fashioned?) e-mail.  User-to-user long-form messaging is what that’s all about.
  • Content: Growing numbers of Facebook pages/groups are starting to be the go-to options for businesses, even before they have their own professional webpages. Having so many users and contacts all right there to plug in to whatever cause, venture or endeavor you’re doing is just too tempting—especially when compared with the work necessary to get a regular website the type of traffic a Facebook page can potentially get with just a few clicks.
  • Advertising:  Sure, you can buy banner ads on the rest of the regular-old internet, but that old dinosaur (I say tongue-in-cheekly, but with an alarming edge of seriousness) is going the way of the…internet.  Why?  What gives Facebook ads a competitive edge?  Immediately available demographic data for pinpoint accuracy and market targetting.
  • Digg-style Media Sharing:  Yup, you can have…really any kind of media shared on Facebook, from video, to pictures, to text and more.
  • Games, games, games:  I’m surprised that this one didn’t blow the rest of them out of the water—or rather, I wouldn’t be surprised if this one wasn’t the number one reason that Facebook is the one-stop shop for everyone and the number one place for spending time.  Facebook games, which always bring in that social attachment, are highly addictive. FarmTown/FarmVille anyone?

I don’t think that there’s a whole lot more that needs to be said here.  I suppose the only thing that Facebook doesn’t have going for it is a good way to search the internet…oops, they have a Google built-in option for that.  I wonder if time spent using the Google plug-in to search the web (while still in the content-frame/shell of Facebook) counts as time for Google?  Probably not.

Basically, you can do anything on Facebook that you can do on the rest of the internet, but with Facebook’s dynamic social-linking engine, you can do it with your friends.

So why would you go anywhere else?

Spoked flywheel

Image via Wikipedia

Well, so far, and I’ve only been at this about a month and (30+ articles or so), I’ve had a quick glimpse on what it takes to make your blog take off.  Here’s an initial round of thoughts on the subject!  (I figured you all needed something better today after that last post.)

1. Keep contributing away… I picked up a booklet at the local grocery megamart today.  Meijer, apparently put out a little pamphelet called “College Survival Guide” or some such thing…I thought it was an ingenious form of marketing, and one that gives credence to the new internet marketing model of “contributing.” Rather than just having ads, this was actually a helpful little boost of information that would do good to the reader/consumer, and also incentive sales…

2. …and see your results take off. Fly away with the flywheel— a term used in business, no less relevant here.  First of all, my blog seems to be following that addage, as I’ve tried to push through my commitment to getting one post out a day, every day, using a buffer, as much as I can.  (By buffer, I’m referring to a period-based block of content, that includes multiple posts ready-written, that are already in-line to go live, before you submit the first one to see the light of day.)  In other words, keep pressing through.  The “flywheel,” as it where, is a device that saves energy, or rather, requires a great deal of exertion up front, but gathers momentum, until it becomes very easy to keep it going, as it has gained an inertial forward-motion of its own.

2.  You have to hit the right time of day. Yes, I mentioned that in the last one or two posts…but I thought I’d mention it again, with a little bit of further explanation.  (I noticed that the blog…it dipped off on the 8th as I posted late in the day—so my “airplane takeoff trajectory” feel on my dashboard stats did a sudden nosedive.)

3. Give people what they want, when they want it. A spike in traffic occurred when I put out my first post about the KindleKindle was hot when it was “trending“—but maybe has lost some of its initial glamor and is now kind of soft in the “looked-at-ness” online.  Point being…it may have been on everyone’s mind, but my second post  about Kindle may have either lacked the same immediacy and/or relevance, or the topic just happened to stop being on everyone’s mind.

See us again for a little look on how a Google post got scraped up!

Google offers a number of contextualized advertising services—where they seem to be making all of their revenue.  AdSense is the commonly known name—and this allows advertisers to literally buy clicks, with a portion of their payment going to Google, and a portion going to the owner of whatever website choose to host those ads.  Seems like a great win-win solution all around.

One thing to note about all of this: things always get a little bit more complicated when money becomes involved. Though you may be used to setting up free accounts from Google and other services on the spur of the moment, this is not an instantaneous process, and does take some review time on Google’s part, as well as some time on yours to set up. Leave yourself a few hours to get it all figured out.

Note: Free WordPress-blog accounts (on WordPress’ on server/site) do not support placing AdSense ads.  You would have to move the back-end PHP files and install them on your own server.  Luckily, there is a forwarding option if you want to keep your traffic (though SEO rank may not transfer) and also do domain mapping, I believe, so that you can keep forwarding from individual blogs.

Stay tuned for my test of Google AdSense ads on this blog.  Here’s my first attempt elsewhere:  LifeTrain, LLC‘s Resume Blog: When Should I Use An Objective On My Resume?.

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